Skip to main content

{Project 101} Weekly Library Challenge: War & Peace + Women's History Month

We are now at Week 6 of Project 101: a Weekly Library Challenge, in which I share what we are reading now (by the end of the year 101 books will be shared in honor of the County of Los Angeles celebrating its 101st birthday this year). For the last couple of weeks, I was focused on Dr. Seuss -- whose birthday is today, so you can pop through the post last week and the week before for some fun Seuss fun. Also, many of the books I have been reading have been biographies. This week that trend continues for me. Plus, I am sharing a wonderful book my boys love that I definitely suggest you add to your lists for Read Across America Month! So, no I did not read War and Peace, rather I read a book related to war and the boys have been loving a beautiful children's book about peace.  


Each week, I share a book the boys are reading from the library and a book I am reading. The book Talk Peace, which I have been reading to the boys could have been featured almost any week because the boys love it so much that we just kept rechecking it from the library -- so many times in fact that we hit our limit. I may have to buy it for them. Written by Sam Williams and illustrated by Mique Moriuchi, the book shares the message that it is always possible to talk peace, whether you talk high or talk low and even proclaims that we can dance peace. We have certainly had some peace dancing at our house with this book. I love the illustrations and the fact that the children in the book reflect the world all around us in their diversity and beauty. It underscores an important message and shares that message in a fun way. 



I have been reading about war -- well not in the way you might think, though. The powerful book I finished last night is Things We Couldn't Say by Diet Eman with James Schaap. I realize, too, that it is a great book to share for Women's History Month because Diet is an extraordinary woman that many of us have never heard of. This book is her amazing story. Diet was a young woman living in The Hague in The Netherlands when Germany invaded and occupied the country during World War II. Initially, she defied the occupiers in small ways by refusing to speak German -- ever. Eventually, though, when the Germans began persecuting Jews and then working to round them up and send them to Germany, Diet (and her fiancee) knew they had to do more. She saved hundreds of lives as a part of the Dutch Resistance finding  farm homes for Jewish families to hide out in and then biking (and later walking) throughout the country to ensure that the families had enough ration cards, false IDs and other items to survive. Her work became even more important when the Germans began forcing Dutch men of a healthy age to go to Germany to work for the war effort (against their will of course). As a woman, she could travel more easily, though she still did end up spending time in jail and in a concentration camp.  



What struck me the most about her story was that despite the horror she personally witnessed, she kept her faith and her commitment to helping others and saving as many people as she could -- even though it cost her dearly. (Many that she loved and cherished died in concentration camps). The resistance group she helped form with her fiancee was called HEIN (Help Elkander In Nood, meaning helping each other need). The book consists of her memories, diary entries and letters she and her fiancee wrote to one another. It has lead me to wonder if I would be so brave and risk so much to help others if I were put in that situation. I would like to think that I would. It also inspires me to always remember to do what I can to help others in need. I feel blessed to have discovered this book. Diet is 92 and still living. You can read excerpts of the book here

Shared at: The Sunday Showcase, Sources of Inspiration, The Children's Bookshelf.  

Other posts from Project 101 and More:
Week 1 of the Project
Week 3: Rosa Parks + More
Acts of Kindness for Everyone

Comments

  1. Things we couldn't say sounds like an amazing story - I love your focus this week!

    ReplyDelete
  2. Thank you so much for doing this! I have loved your posts and the book selections you have made. I have already read a few and am so excited to read the others....thank you so much for the inspiration to feed our minds and that of our families with good and to live it out in our actions!

    ReplyDelete
  3. Great recommendations, thank you! My grandfather was in the Dutch Resistance so I will have to check that book out.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Have you read "The Hiding Place" by Corrie Ten Boom? Similar story. I love this take on Women's History Month.

    ReplyDelete
  5. These look like wonderful inspiring reads. You describe them so well.

    Thanks for linking up :)

    Sarah @ A Cat-Like Curiosity

    ReplyDelete
  6. Thanks for sharing "Things we couldn't say". It must have taken so much courage to do what she did!
    -Reshama
    www.stackingbooks.com

    ReplyDelete
  7. These look great. Thanks for sharing at The Children's Bookshelf.

    ReplyDelete

Post a Comment

Popular posts from this blog

Happy Very Hungry Caterpillar Day: Celebrating 45 Years with Caterpillar and Butterfly Crafts from The Kid's Co-Op

March 20th is Very Hungry Caterpillar Day with celebrations and programs being held around the world to honor the 45th Anniversary of the book. 


We love The Very Hungry Caterpillar, so of course we're joining the fun. Plus, my youngest son's blog nickname is Caterpillar, after the book. Just as Wild Thing is my 4 year-old's nickname inspired by Where the Wild Things Are. 

Today, we'll be doing another Very Hungry Caterpillar Food Drive. We did our first one for Eric Carle's birthday last June and called it a Very Hungry Caterpillar Virtual Food Drive and loved hearing that the virtual part worked, as others were inspired by our online shares and also did VHC-inspired food drives.

P.S. The Very Hungry Caterpillar Virtual Food Drive post 
also features 40+ Activities Inspired by the Book, so you'll definitely want to check it out.
For our VHC-inspired food drive this time, Wild Thing will be helping me write the grocery list for food items to donate as we read the boo…

{A Season of Giving} 12 Days of Christmas: Celebrating through Giving

Stacy (the Great) of Kids Stuff World brought to my attention the 31 Days of Service/Giving Calender (and great e-book) from Mom It Forward. 

Having gotten to know Stacy really well through our joint Moms Fighting Hunger effort during Hunger Action Month, I was all too happen to jump on board and take on 12 Days of Christmas, the action prompt for Dec. 4th.


The e-book describes the prompt in this way:
Choose another family in your area to be the recipient of 12 days of gift giving. Try to think of a family that may be struggling financially, emotionally, or with health problems and might need a boost during the holiday season.E ach day, starting December 13, leave a gift anonymously on the doorstep of your chosen family. Involve the kiddos in your secret acts of service. Your gifts can relate to the “12 Days of Christmas” song verses (i.e. partridge in a pear tree, turtle doves, French hens, etc.) but it’s not necessary. Try to choose or provide handmade gifts, drawings or tre…

Happy Birthday, Eric Carle~We're Doing a Very Hungry Caterpillar Virtual Food Drive to Help Very Hungry Kids! Join Us!!

Summer is officially here (for half of the world anyway). For many of us, school was out well before the First Day of Summer/Summer Solstice on June 21st. While summer means beaches, pools and vacation for many families, it also means increased food insecurity for others. Food budgets increase for almost everyone in the summer, and families that rely on free and reduced school lunches struggle with the loss of these much needed meals (many schools also provide breakfast to children as well and for many children, their only meals are the ones they eat at school). For some reason, thoughts of the summer struggle against hunger surged to the forefront of my brain every time I read The Very Hungry Caterpillar by Eric Carle, or overheard Wild Thing reading it to himself or his father or brother (he has the whole book memorized). 

Finally, it came together, that caterpillar who is so very hungry and needs all of those food items in order to become a beautiful butterfly made me think of all o…